Gnarly Old Trees

palmetto growing in tree fork

This is the first time I have seen a palmetto growing in a tree fork.

 

The trees here at Magnolia Park fascinate me.  Such noble old great-grandfather trees with fantastic stories to tell if only we could understand tree language.  These trees are so individualistic.  It’s almost like they ought to have names — like Joseph, Methusela, Luther and Eugene.  Oh, and Harold!  😀

This tree is a gigantic flower pot for ferns.

This tree is a gigantic flower pot for ferns.

The day use park and campground were full of little children today.  They are so cute and so much fun to watch.  It is especially sweet to see a shy little girl trying to scrunch up her courage to pet Sheba.  Sheba bounces, but rarely actually jumps up on them now.  The kids are always amazed at her soft, silky fur.

I have almost floated through the day… so happy for the gift of being here!  Other than being happy and grilling yummy pork chops tonight, it’s a slow news day!

This tree needs to have a tire swing hung from it.

This tree needs to have a tire swing hung from it.

A see-through tree

A see-through tree

Sextuplets.  5 still living.  :)

Sextuplets. 5 still living. 🙂

A long, skinny split

A long, skinny split

Quintuplets

Quintuplets

This tree has had extensive surgery.

This tree has had extensive surgery.

Only the palms are straight.

Only the palms are straight.

 

 

Fantastic Forms Down by the Water

 

Huge tree kept from toppling into the lake by rocky supports.

Precarious twins

Precarious twins

It’s still sweltering here.  Far too hot to do anything energetic.  So I’ve meandered around amusing myself by searching out intriguing and unusual natural formations.

Many of the trees at waters’ edge just about have the supporting earth washed away.  It looks like the Army Corps of Engineers has put rocks around some of the more precarious ones to help support them.  But every time a jet ski flies by, strong waves crash relentlessly against them, taking a bit more of the red clay support.  And leaving even more fantastic forms behind.

This one can't last long.  It looks like grandaddy long-legs spider legs are holding it up.

This one can’t last long. It looks like grandaddy long-legs spider legs are holding it up.

We have had nice, strong breezes today as the ever-threatened, seldom-materialized thunderstorms pass us by.

One thing this trip has taught us is not to ever camp in South Carolina in the summertime again!

Ron brought home superb Mexican take-out for dinner this evening.

I’m still drawing plans for a camper van.  I am so itching to tackle that project!  Hopefully next year!

Clutching at the disappearing earth

Clutching at the disappearing earth

Interlocking roots

Interlocking roots

Odd trees on the swamp side

Odd trees on the swamp side

Trumpet flower vine hidden in underbrush

Trumpet flower vine hidden in underbrush

Growing at water's edge.  I used to know their name, but have forgotten and am too lazy to look them up.  :)

Growing at water’s edge. I used to know their name, but have forgotten and am too lazy to look them up. 🙂

Sunlight  glinting on water

Sunlight glinting on water

Thunderclouds passing over

Thunderclouds passing over

 

 

 

A Little Rain After All

After yesterday’s whining about the rain passing us by, we finally got rain!  No hard rain, but a steady drizzle most of the night and today.   And it’s still drizzling on and off.

I think we’ll extend our stay here a couple of days and see if mushrooms start popping up Wednesday or so.

Since I can’t get out and take pictures today, I was going through others I’ve taken here and found some interesting and odd forest features to share.

A thick old vine embraces a young tree

Virginia Creeper on a tree

Dogwood berries

White flowers and an upside down ladybug

Old turkey tail fungi

Thick, fuzzy vines running up a pine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenbrier berries

Another vine covered tree trunk

 

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