FDR, the Famous TP Roll & More

The roll of toilet paper that was in service when FDR died in 1945 (right and inset).  A plastic cover was placed over it to stop visitors from taking a sheet as a souvenir.  The bathroom was mounted away from the wall so FDR could grasp the tub with both hands and swing himself into the tub.  The toilet was raised to be wheelchair accessible.  The lavatory (not shown) was also lowered.

The roll of toilet paper that was in service when FDR died in 1945 (right and inset). A plastic cover was placed over it to stop visitors from taking a sheet as a souvenir. The bathtub was mounted away from the wall so FDR could grasp it with both hands and swing himself into the tub. The toilet was raised to be wheelchair accessible. The lavatory (not shown) was also lowered.

I wasn’t going to do another Little White House post.  But two commenters mentioned the 69 year old toilet paper roll — and I must admit, it made an impression on me, too.  So here it is.  😀

Servants' quarters on left; guesthouse on right.

Servants’ quarters on left; guesthouse on right.

That also gives me an excuse to devote a post to the areas I didn’t cover yesterday — the servants’ quarters and the guesthouse, which were my favorites.  Probably because they remind me a bit of doll houses.

I’m also including a picture of the life size portrait Roosevelt was sitting for

Servants' bedroom #1

Servants’ bedroom #1

when he had a massive stroke and died later that day.  The portrait was never finished.  The artist, however, later copied the unfinished portrait, changed the tie from red to blue, and so finished the portrait she had promised him.

One final photo — of Graham Jackson, naval musician with tears streaming down his face as he played “Going Home” as Roosevelt’s body passed before the patients at Georgia Hall for a final goodbye on April 13, 1945.

Servants' bedroom #2

Servants’ bedroom #2

Servants' living room

Servants’ living room

Guesthouse sitting room

Guesthouse sitting room

Guesthouse bedroom (through glass)

Guesthouse bedroom (through glass)

Graham Jackson

Graham Jackson

The unfinished portrait

The unfinished portrait

 

 

Little White House

Guest house on left, Little White House in center, servants' quarters on right

Guest house on left, Little White House in center, servants’ quarters on right

I have edited out my political commentary on FDR and am just leaving photos I took of the Little White House in Warm Springs, GA today.

Roosevelt built the facilities so he could be near Warm Springs, where he swam and exercised in the 88 degree waters to treat his legs which had been paralyzed by polio. 

While having his portrait painted, he had a massive stroke and died in his Little White House at 63 years old. The unfinished portrait is displayed in one of the buildings in the memorial complex.

Inside the Little White House in Warm Springs, GA

The LWH dining room

The LWH dining room

I fell in love with the houses.  Oddly enough, I loved the servants’ quarters and the guest house best.  I could not get a photo of his secretary’s room because it is surrounded by glass and the reflections on the glass were too strong.

Eleanor's bedroom.  The extra bed was for a grandchild. When she brought more than one, they stayed in the guesthouse.

Eleanor’s bedroom. The extra bed was for a grandchild. When she brought more than one, they stayed in the guesthouse.

I took dozens of photos, but have tried to select photos of the Little White House that I thought you would most enjoy seeing.

After we finished the tour, it was back to LuBelle’s Ice Cream Parlor for another treat.  This time I chose the Birthday flavor.  It was vanilla ice cream with chunks of chocolate cake, icing and sprinkles.  Unfortunately, it was a little too sweet for my taste.  I think I’ll have a plain vanilla before we leave here!  🙂

FDR's bedroom

FDR’s bedroom

 

Butler's pantry

Butler’s pantry

 

The kitchen

The kitchen

 

 

Kitchen utility

Kitchen utility

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