A Cold Casita and More About Wild Yams

Lynne called today from Salt Springs to ask which replacement converter we had bought.  I was so tickled to hear from her.  Amazingly, our phone connection held, which is better than any cell reception I got when we were down there!  I’m hoping we will be able to get to Florida before they have to leave, but am not sure if we can make it work.

Tonight is predicted to be the first really cold, below freezing night we’ve had this winter.  I have the Casita winterized, but need to bring all the canned and staple foods that I generally leave in the trailer inside so they don’t freeze.

Greene Deane, author and prolific wild edible foods video producer, has tentatively identified my wild yams (from yesterday’s post) as Dioscorea Polystachya.  Due to the immense variability of the leaves, he hesitated to give me an absolutely positive identification, but with that lead, I should be able to name my yams when they come up this year.

What’s cool is, if that is what they are, I’ve added another excellent wild edible to my natural grocery sources!

Here is a quote from Green Deane’s website about it:

One-year-old roots weigh about 3 ounces, two-year-old roots, a pound. The root, in good soil, can grow up to three feet long and weight up to five pounds.  Its flavor is between a sweet potato and a regular potato. It is 20% starch, 75% water, 0.1% B1, and has 10 to 15 mgs vitamin C. The most common use is cooked like a potato. The Japanese prefer it raw. However, varieties can differer and I do not recommend you eat it raw. Cook it, or experiment with it raw very carefully.

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