Watson’s Mill Covered Bridge

Watson's Mill Bridge

Watson’s Mill Bridge

The bridge is still used by vehicular traffic.  The vertical clearance is 9'.

The bridge is still used by vehicular traffic. The vertical clearance is 9′.

Today Peggy and I took the trail from the campground to the covered bridge.  Although they have 7 miles of trails, it was only 3/4 to the bridge.  But it was narrow, steep and rugged in places.

I was delighted to realize I could do it without getting winded.  My recovery after quitting smoking last September is phenomenal! We did cheat and take the road walk back to the campground to avoid tripping on roots, though.

Bridge interior

Bridge interior

We could not have ordered more beautiful weather.  Warm, sunny, gorgeous, with a gentle, refreshing breeze and low humidity!  Spring at its very best.

I took tons of pictures of Peggy’s cute little 17′ Apex trailer.  She has done a beautiful job personalizing and decorating it.

I’ll post those pictures tomorrow.

closeup of joining pegs

Closeup of wooden joining pins

 

Peggy on trail bridge

Peggy on trail bridge

rugged narrow trail

Along the trail

 

Smooth, scenic trail near the old gristmill site

Smooth, scenic trail near the old gristmill site

Watson’s Mill Bridge State Park

 

Watson's Mill Bridge

Watson’s Mill Bridge

We’re at Watson’s Mill Bridge State Park in Comer, GA this evening.  It’s out in the middle of nowhere — far from a town of any size, in beautiful, green, rolling hill country.  It’s a small, very pretty park with one loop of huge camp sites, most of which are pull thrus for smaller rigs.

Here’s a little about the bridge from the campground’s website:

Watson Mill Bridge contains the longest covered bridge in the state, spanning 229 feet across the South Fork River. Built in 1885 by Washington (W.W.) King, son of freed slave and famous covered-bridge builder Horace King, the bridge is supported by a town lattice truss system held firmly together with wooden pins.  At one time, Georgia had more than 200 covered bridges; today, less than 20 remain.

I took the bridge photo in a light rain.  Hopefully tomorrow will be better picture taking weather.

We missed our turn twice on the way here, which added an hour and a whole lot of stress to the trip.  Peggy showed up shortly after we arrived.  She also had missed a turn that added an hour to her trip — and she was stressed out, too.

Our campsites

Our campsites

But once we got set up and had time to get together and talk, the pain of getting here was forgotten.  We had a wonderful time visiting.

After dinner, Ron and I planned to walk the dogs along one of the trails.  But the signs did not say how long the trails were or whether they were loops or not, and I was afraid of being caught out in the woods after dark.  So we’ll explore them tomorrow.

There are no photos of Peggy and myself because we looked too rain frazzled.  But the rain cleared up late today and the sun came out.  The next two days are supposed to be sunshiny and beautiful.

 

 

 

 

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