We Found Spring!

Bee on redbud tree blossoms

Bee on redbud tree blossoms

When we got to Coleman Lake on Sunday, it was windy and chilly.  But Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday were the kind of days that spring dreams are made of —  golden sunshine, blue skies, white puffy clouds, and temperatures in the 70’s.

bluets2

Bluets, I think.

I had almost  forgotten the wonder of sunshine on my shoulders radiating warmth down into my bones.  And soft, balmy breezes that felt like caresses against my winter-weary skin.  And the whole world seemingly bursting with new buds and shoots and blossoms.

 

We’re home now, and the rain and dreary weather are back.  But those four beautiful days will live in our memories for a long time.

purple violet

Violet

 

I’ll wait till tomorrow to post camping photos.  Today I want to share spring flower photos with all of you up North who are despairing that spring will ever arrive.

Another kind of violet.  The flower looks like a birdsfoot violet, but the leaves are wrong.

Another kind of violet. The flower looks like a birdsfoot violet, but the leaves are wrong.

Yellow violets

Yellow violets

Light blue/white violets

Light blue/white violets

I'm not sure what these are.  They reminded me of the song, "White coral bells upon a slender stalk....."

I’m not sure what these are. They reminded me of the song, “White coral bells upon a slender stalk…..”

Wild ginger flowers.  These grow on the ground and are pollinated by crawling insects.  You usually have to move back leaf litter to find them.

Wild ginger flowers. These grow on the ground and are pollinated by crawling insects. You usually have to move back leaf litter to find them.

We saw this flowering tree when we drove into Tallapoosa for groceries.

We saw this flowering tree when we drove into Tallapoosa for groceries.

butterfly1

And a flower of the animal kingdom. 🙂

Spring — Already!

Tiny little henbit flowers

I can hardly wrap my mind around the fact that spring is here again.  Or that I have lived here for so many years and photographed the same little flowers– or their parents — for so many springs.  Yet, their welcome little faces are always new to me.

White daffodils

Everything is very early this year due to our non-winter.  The daffodils are almost finished.  Only 3 blooms remain.

Hope you enjoy the familiar nature show.  🙂

Perennial vinca comes back every year around our front porch.

Sweet little bluets carpet the open woods

These tasteless little Indian strawberries have almost completely crowded out the delicious wild strawberries.

Not sure what these are. I think they are crabapple flower buds.

New fig leaves

New rosebud

Last year's green onions are blooming

 

A bumper crop of dandelions is on the way!

Moss on an old plum tree

The white plum flowers have fallen. Now baby plums are on the way.

Sweet Wildflower Tonic

Stars of Bethlehem

I was feeling down today so took a walk to lift my spirits.  As usual, the stunning natural beauty that surrounds our property was the tonic that my spirit needed.

I first learned to identify Star of Bethlehem when I seriously studied wild edible plants.  I knew them then as poisonous plants to be avoided.  But now, I see them as little white gems of exquisite beauty.

I learned to identify Venus Looking Glass one year as I puzzled over the  weeds

Venus looking glass. On edit — these are misidentified. A blog reader gave me the correct ID. They are common vetch. Still gorgeous, though. 🙂

with purple flowers that ran rampant in my square foot gardens in early spring.  Now I treasure them as a gift before vegetable garden planting season begins. (On edit, I misidentified these flowers.  See photo caption.)

Little bluets delight me.  They are so small that they are easily missed unless your eyes are open to the tiny wonders under your feet.

I am not sure what the little purple flowers on tall stalks are.  They have always grown everywhere I’ve lived since I was a child, but it occurs to me that I have neglected to learn their name.   I will do a search and try to discover their secret.

Sweet little bluets, almost hidden underfoot

And dandelions.  When I lived in condos and apartments and houses in town, they were an eyesore and a blot on unbroken green, manicured lawns.  Then, in my edible plant studies, I discovered what a marvel they truly are.  Since then I have been fascinated by their intricate, enduring beauty.

I think age has also softened my perspective on what a wonder these precious little weeds are.

I need to learn this little treasure’s name. [on edit, a commenter has identified these as toadflax, possibly blue toadflax. Thanks, Kara!]

The greatly underappreciated, marvelous little dandelion

The endlessly fascinating little puffball that promises the next generation of dandelions. 🙂

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